Monday, 17 September 2012

The Barbados-South Carolina Connection

     The influence of Barbados on South Carolina is unmistakable.  Charles Towne (present day Charleston) was settled for the most part by planters and African slaves arriving from Barbados.  Seven of the first 21 Governors of South Carolina came from Barbados or had strong Barbados ties.  Having lived in Charleston through the 1980s--post-Hurricane Hugo and post-urban redeveIopment--I was amazed at the similarities in language, architecture, and culture.  Of all the Caribbbean islands, Barbados is much like the South Carolina Lowcountry.  Having spent time on East Bay Street in Charleston, I snapped a few shots of another Bay Street.  Explore the Barbados-Charleston connection for yourself!  

Beaches of Barbados

 The beaches of Barbados are among the best in the world.  These pictures were taken from the Barbados Hilton at Needham's Point.  The beaches consist of fine, white (almost stone colored), and sandy.  I would also say that the waters and horizon seem to hold more shades of blue than other Caribbean islands.  In keeping with its British roots, I would say the Barbados tourism product is upscale, sophisticated, and perhaps a bit reserved.   Perfect for relaxation or romantic getaways.  A perfect setting for a wedding or a wedding planning class!
 Just outside the
Barbados Hilton
 Carlisle Bay also features a great beach with a view of Bridgetown
 A Three Hour Tour?
A Room with a View!

Bajan Architecture

  Bajan (pronounced Bay-jun) architecture ranges from the elegant to just plain fun such as this roaring red tavern!  I was especially interested in structures that reminded me of "Old Charleston" above King Street and in outlying areas.  Sadly, these structures are disappearing fast in both South Carolina and Barbados.  More cultural exchanges are needed to presevation these historical and cultural threads.  I am sure there is no lack of volunteers :)
 Charlestonesque Houses
Bay Street Mansion--the Bajan "Battery"

Sugarcane Sunset

Another day in 400 years of history--still enough sugarcane under cultivation to get lost.